LUXURY

WOYOYO combines Georgian knitting culture and design into a modern aesthetic. Knitting, which is widely used in the Georgian tradition, has been re-conceptualized to show off a style, an amalgam of tradition and modern aesthetics.
WOYOYO makes luxury bags, by all accounts, embracing slow fashion with a conscious philosophy and celebrating individuality and authenticity. Genuine craftsmanship and demanding artisan methods make our products of exceptional quality.

MATERIALS
An unusual usage of two materials, wood and yarn, builds an unlikely combination that makes Leko Melashvili’s designs elaborately masterful with outstanding quality. We primarily use Georgian Walnut heart wood, well known in the world for its exquisite quality and excellent woodworking properties. We deeply appreciate the texture, the qualities, and the visual value that natural wood offers to our products. As for yarn, we use high quality yarn, specifically acrylic or mercerized cotton, due to their longevity and practicality.
WOYOYO makes luxury bags, by all accounts, embracing slow fashion with a conscious philosophy and celebrating individuality and authenticity. Genuine craftsmanship and demanding artisan methods make our products of exceptional quality.
TECHNOLOGY
Our products wouldn’t have this luxury feel if we didn’t have superb handknitting quality. The exceptionally hard technique used by Leko to create a defining knitting pattern distinctive to all our handbags and accessories without using stitches makes our handbags so hard and exhausting to make. Our handbags go through a painstaking process in both craftsmanship and design in order to get all the measurements correct before they are handcrafted. In our designs, every millimeter matters. All must be perfectly met.
At WOYOYO, we are using innovative wooden handbag mechanisms developed by Leko Melashvili and our partners. These mechanisms are unique to WOYOYO bags.
INNOVATION

Where there is technology, there is bound to be innovation to drive it forward. Without innovating at every level of production, we would not have come to this point. By consciously limiting ourselves to using only two materials, wood and yarn, we often had to overcome issues of practicality during the manufacturing process. This process applies both to woodwork and knitting. One had to be perennially pushed to reliably accommodate the other.